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Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2022-06-20 and last amended on 2022-03-06. Previous Versions

Part VI — General Operating and Flight Rules (continued)

Subpart 4 — Private Operators (continued)

Division XIII — Flight Attendants and Emergency Evacuation (continued)

Single-aisle Aeroplane

 Despite section 605.09, no person shall conduct a take-off in a single-aisle aeroplane that is carrying passengers unless all emergency exits and escape slides are operative.

  • SOR/2015-127, s. 12
Standardization

 No private operator shall operate an aeroplane that is configured to carry 20 or more passengers unless the emergency equipment, the stowage locations for emergency equipment and the emergency procedures are standardized for all aeroplanes in the private operator’s fleet that are configured to carry 20 or more passengers.

  • SOR/2015-127, s. 14

Subpart 5 — Aircraft Requirements

Application

  •  (1) This Subpart applies to

    • (a) persons operating Canadian aircraft other than ultra-light aeroplanes, hang gliders or remotely piloted aircraft; and

    • (b) persons operating foreign aircraft in Canada, other than remotely piloted aircraft, if those persons are Canadian citizens, permanent residents or corporations incorporated by or under the laws of Canada or a province.

  • (2) The following requirements apply to persons operating foreign aircraft, other than persons referred to in paragraph (1)(b), while those aircraft are operated in Canada:

    • (a) the requirement to carry a flight authority on board the aircraft in accordance with section 605.03;

    • (b) the requirement that an aircraft be equipped with transponder and automatic pressure-altitude reporting equipment in accordance with section 605.35;

    • (c) the requirement that an aircraft be equipped with one or more ELTs in accordance with section 605.38; and

    • (d) radiocommunication and radio navigation equipment requirements that are specific to the aircraft and types of flight referred to in sections 605.14 to 605.21.

[605.02 reserved]

Division I — Aircraft Requirements — General

Flight Authority
  •  (1) No person shall operate an aircraft in flight unless

    • (a) a flight authority is in effect in respect of the aircraft;

    • (b) the aircraft is operated in accordance with the conditions set out in the flight authority; and

    • (c) subject to subsections (2) and (3), the flight authority is carried on board the aircraft.

  • (2) Where a specific-purpose flight permit has been issued pursuant to section 507.04, an aircraft may be operated without the flight authority carried on board where

    • (a) the flight is conducted in Canadian airspace; and

    • (b) an entry is made into the journey log indicating

      • (i) that the aircraft is operating under a specific-purpose flight permit, and

      • (ii) where applicable, any operational conditions that pertain to flight operations under the specific-purpose flight permit.

  • (3) A balloon may be operated without the flight authority carried on board where the flight authority is immediately available to the pilot-in-command

    • (a) prior to commencing a flight; and

    • (b) on completion of the flight.

Availability of Aircraft Flight Manual
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft, for which an aircraft flight manual is required by the applicable standards of airworthiness, unless the aircraft flight manual or, if an aircraft operating manual has been established under section 604.37 or Part VII, the aircraft operating manual is available to the flight crew members at their duty stations.

  • (2) The aircraft flight manual or, if an aircraft operating manual has been established under section 604.37 or Part VII, those parts of the aircraft flight manual that are incorporated into the aircraft operating manual shall include all the amendments and supplementary material that are applicable to the aircraft type.

  • SOR/2005-341, s. 6
  • SOR/2014-131, s. 19
Markings and Placards

 No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft in respect of which markings or placards are required by the applicable standards of airworthiness unless the markings or placards are affixed to the aircraft or attached to a component of the aircraft in accordance with those standards.

Aircraft Equipment Standards and Serviceability

 No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft, or permit another person to conduct a take-off in an aircraft in their custody and control, unless the aircraft equipment required by these Regulations

  • (a) meets the applicable standards of airworthiness; and

  • (b) is serviceable and, where required by operational circumstances, functioning, except if otherwise provided in section 605.08, 605.09 or 605.10.

Minimum Equipment Lists
  •  (1) The Minister may, in accordance with the MMEL/MEL Policy and Procedures Manual, establish a master minimum equipment list for each type of aircraft.

  • (2) The Minister may supplement a master minimum equipment list that has been issued by the competent authority of a foreign state in respect of a type of aircraft where necessary to ensure compliance with the MMEL/MEL Policy and Procedures Manual.

  • (3) Where a master minimum equipment list has been established for an aircraft type pursuant to subsection (1) or supplemented pursuant to subsection (2), the Minister shall approve a minimum equipment list in respect of each operator of that type of aircraft, if the requirements set out in the MMEL/MEL Policy and Procedures Manual are met.

Unserviceable and Removed Equipment — General
  •  (1) Despite subsection (2) and sections 605.09 and 605.10, no person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft that has equipment that is not serviceable or from which equipment has been removed if, in the opinion of the pilot-in-command, aviation safety is affected.

  • (2) Despite sections 605.09 and 605.10, a person may conduct a take-off in an aircraft that has equipment that is not serviceable or from which equipment has been removed where the aircraft is operated in accordance with the conditions of a flight permit that has been issued specifically for that purpose.

Unserviceable and Removed Equipment — Aircraft with a Minimum Equipment List
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), where a minimum equipment list has been approved in respect of the operator of an aircraft pursuant to subsection 605.07(3), no person shall conduct a take-off in the aircraft with equipment that is not serviceable or that has been removed unless

    • (a) the aircraft is operated in accordance with any conditions or limitations specified in the minimum equipment list; and

    • (b) a copy of the minimum equipment list is carried on board.

  • (2) Where the conditions or limitations specified in a minimum equipment list are in conflict with the requirements of an airworthiness directive, the airworthiness directive prevails.

Unserviceable and Removed Equipment — Aircraft without a Minimum Equipment List
  •  (1) Where a minimum equipment list has not been approved in respect of the operator of an aircraft, no person shall conduct a take-off in the aircraft with equipment that is not serviceable or that has been removed, where that equipment is required by

    • (a) the standards of airworthiness that apply to day or night VFR or IFR flight, as applicable;

    • (b) any equipment list published by the aircraft manufacturer respecting aircraft equipment that is required for the intended flight;

    • (c) an air operator certificate, a special authorization issued under subsection 604.05(2), a special flight operations certificate or a flight training unit operating certificate;

    • (d) an airworthiness directive; or

    • (e) these Regulations.

  • (2) Where a minimum equipment list has not been approved in respect of the operator of an aircraft and the aircraft has equipment, other than the equipment required by subsection (1), that is not serviceable or that has been removed, no person shall conduct a take-off in the aircraft unless

    • (a) where the unserviceable equipment is not removed from the aircraft, it is isolated or secured so as not to constitute a hazard to any other aircraft system or to any person on board the aircraft;

    • (b) the appropriate placards are installed as required by the Aircraft Equipment and Maintenance Standards; and

    • (c) an entry recording the actions referred to in paragraphs (a) and (b) is made in the journey log, as applicable.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 20

[605.11 to 605.13 reserved]

Division II — Aircraft Equipment Requirements

Power-driven Aircraft — Day VFR

 No person shall conduct a take-off in a power-driven aircraft for the purpose of day VFR flight unless it is equipped with

  • (a) where the aircraft is operated in uncontrolled airspace, an altimeter;

  • (b) where the aircraft is operated in controlled airspace, a sensitive altimeter adjustable for barometric pressure;

  • (c) an airspeed indicator;

  • (d) a magnetic compass or a magnetic direction indicator that operates independently of the aircraft electrical generating system;

  • (e) a tachometer for each engine and for each propeller or rotor that has limiting speeds established by the manufacturer;

  • (f) an oil pressure indicator for each engine employing an oil pressure system;

  • (g) a coolant temperature indicator for each liquid-cooled engine;

  • (h) an oil temperature indicator for each air-cooled engine having a separate oil system;

  • (i) a manifold pressure gauge for each

    • (i) reciprocating engine equipped with a variable-pitch propeller,

    • (ii) reciprocating engine used to power a helicopter,

    • (iii) supercharged engine, and

    • (iv) turbocharged engine;

  • (j) a means for the flight crew, when seated at the flight controls to determine

    • (i) the fuel quantity in each main fuel tank, and

    • (ii) if the aircraft employs retractable landing gear, the position of the landing gear;

  • (k) subject to subsections 601.08(2) and 601.09(2), a radiocommunication system adequate to permit two-way communication on the appropriate frequency when the aircraft is operated within

    • (i) Class B, Class C or Class D airspace,

    • (ii) an MF area, unless the aircraft is operated pursuant to subsection 602.97(3), or

    • (iii) the ADIZ;

  • (l) where the aircraft is operated under Subpart 4 of this Part, or under Subpart 3, 4 or 5 of Part VII, radiocommunication equipment adequate to permit two-way communication on the appropriate frequency;

  • (m) where the aircraft is operated in Class B airspace, radio navigation equipment that will enable it to be operated in accordance with a flight plan; and

  • (n) where the aircraft is operated under Subpart 4 of this Part or under Subpart 5 of Part VII, radio navigation equipment that is adequate to receive radio signals from a transmitting facility.

Power-driven Aircraft — VFR OTT
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a power-driven aircraft for the purpose of VFR OTT flight unless it is equipped with

    • (a) the equipment referred to in paragraphs 605.14(c) to (j);

    • (b) a sensitive altimeter adjustable for barometric pressure;

    • (c) a means of preventing malfunction caused by icing for each airspeed indicating system;

    • (d) a gyroscopic direction indicator or a stabilized magnetic direction indicator;

    • (e) an attitude indicator;

    • (f) subject to subsection (2), a turn and slip indicator or turn coordinator;

    • (g) where the aircraft is to be operated within the Northern Domestic Airspace, a means of establishing direction that is not dependent on a magnetic source;

    • (h) radiocommunication equipment adequate to permit two-way communication on the appropriate frequency; and

    • (i) radio navigation equipment adequate to permit the aircraft to be navigated safely.

  • (2) Where the aircraft is equipped with a third attitude indicator that is usable through flight attitudes of 360° of pitch and roll for an aeroplane, or ± 80° of pitch and ± 120° of roll for a helicopter, the aircraft may be equipped with a slip-skid indicator in lieu of a turn and slip indicator or a turn coordinator.

  • SOR/2006-77, s. 18
Power-driven Aircraft — Night VFR
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a power-driven aircraft for the purpose of night VFR flight, unless it is equipped with

    • (a) the equipment referred to in paragraphs 605.14(c) to (n);

    • (b) a sensitive altimeter adjustable for barometric pressure;

    • (c) subject to subsection (2), a turn and slip indicator or turn coordinator;

    • (d) an adequate source of electrical energy for all of the electrical and radio equipment;

    • (e) in respect of every set of fuses of a particular rating that is installed on the aircraft and accessible to the pilot-in-command during flight, a number of spare fuses that is equal to at least 50 per cent of the total number of installed fuses of that rating;

    • (f) where the aircraft is operated so that an aerodrome is not visible from the aircraft, a stabilized magnetic direction indicator or a gyroscopic direction indicator;

    • (g) where the aircraft is to be operated within the Northern Domestic Airspace, a means of establishing direction that is not dependent on a magnetic source;

    • (h) where the aircraft is an airship operated within controlled airspace, radar reflectors attached in such a manner as to be capable of a 360-degree reflection;

    • (i) a means of illumination for all of the instruments used to operate the aircraft;

    • (j) when carrying passengers, a landing light; and

    • (k) position and anti-collision lights that conform to the Aircraft Equipment and Maintenance Standards.

  • (2) Where the aircraft is equipped with a third attitude indicator that is usable through flight attitudes of 360° of pitch and roll for an aeroplane, or ± 80° of pitch and ± 120° of roll for a helicopter, the aircraft may be equipped with a slip-skid indicator in lieu of a turn and slip indicator or a turn coordinator.

  • (3) No person shall operate an aircraft that is equipped with any light that may be mistaken for, or downgrade the conspicuity of, a light in the navigation light system, unless the aircraft is being operated for the purpose of aerial advertising.

  • (4) In addition to the equipment requirements specified in subsection (1), no person shall operate an aircraft in night VFR flight under Subpart 4 of this Part or Subparts 2 to 5 of Part VII, unless the aircraft is equipped with

    • (a) an attitude indicator;

    • (b) a vertical speed indicator;

    • (c) a means of preventing malfunction caused by icing for each airspeed indicating system; and

    • (d) an outside air temperature gauge.

  • SOR/2006-77, s. 19
Use of Position and Anti-collision Lights
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall operate an aircraft in the air or on the ground at night, or on water between sunset and sunrise, unless the aircraft position lights and anti-collision lights are turned on.

  • (2) Anti-collision lights may be turned off where the pilot-in-command determines that, because of operating conditions, doing so would be in the interests of aviation safety.

 
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